Author: verso

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The world is certainly an unusual place at the moment. Unprecedented in modern times, in fact. And as we navigate what may be the new usual for a little while, it’s important we reflect on our guiding principle here at Discovery - to stay curious,...

400 Million years ago the New England region was on the bottom of the ocean. Almost all of the rocks to be found look just like the types of sedimentary rocks forming on the deep ocean floor today: lots of mudstone and shale. There are...

The global coronavirus pandemic has required us to think about, among other things, what constitutes an essential service to society. In Australia it is only ‘essential services’ that can remain open for business while individuals, families and whole communities are asked to physically isolate themselves...

You can join Australia's original pollinator citizen science project between 12-19 of April to help count wild pollinators in your local environment and help build the database on wild pollinator activity....

Today we’re voyaging with our friends Science Sparks where you can create a Lorax whisper-ma-phone from paper cups and string!...

PARENTS AND TEACHERS - here's a great way to get outside and play with your young scientists!...

Have you heard some interesting sounds coming from your backyard that you think might be a frog? Today we’re voyaging over to our friends at the Australian Museum with a very cool national citizen science project - FrogID. Citizen science projects are activities through which...

The echidna (say eh-kid-nah), also called the spiny anteater, belongs to a special group of mammals called monotremes. Monotremes are animals that lay eggs but feed their babies milk. Platypus are the only other animals that are monotremes in the world, and they are both...